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Great Jamaicans in history

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Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Sat May 14, 2016 6:53 am

"Samuel Sharpe was the main instigator of the 1831 Slave Rebellion, which began on the Kensington Estate in St. James and which was largely instrumental in bringing about the abolition of slavery. Because of his intelligence and leadership qualities, Sam Sharpe became a “daddy”, or leader of the native Baptists in Montego Bay. Religious meetings were the only permissible forms of organised activities for the slaves. Sam Sharpe was able to communicate his concern and encourage political thought, concerning events in England which affected the slaves and Jamaica. Sam evolved a plan of passive resistance in 1831, by which the slaves would refuse to work on Christmas Day of 1831 and afterwards, unless their grievances concerning better treatment and the consideration of freedom, were accepted by the state owners and managers."

http://jis.gov.jm/heroes/samuel-sharpe/
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Sun May 15, 2016 3:38 am

"Born in Jamaica, Marcus Garvey was an orator for the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League. Garvey advanced a Pan-African philosophy which inspired a global mass movement, known as Garveyism. Garveyism would eventually inspire others, from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement. Social activist Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. was born on August 17, 1887, in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica. Self-educated, Garvey founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association, dedicated to promoting African-Americans and resettlement in Africa."

http://www.biography.com/people/marcus- ... 9#synopsis
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Mon May 16, 2016 1:21 am

"Ten years have now passed since the death of Father Hugh Sherlock, founder of Boys' Town in 1940. Father to hundreds of youth in his lifetime, was always a paragon of virtue as he sought to instil sound values and attitudes. A Methodist minister and man of many letters, including an honorary doctorate, he walked with kings but didn't lose the common touch. A co-author of the Jamaica National Anthem, Father Sherlock was active in the national movement for independence."

http://www.my-island-jamaica.com/famous ... ators.html
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Tue May 17, 2016 1:11 am

"Amy Bailey gave voluntary service to numerous underprivileged girls in the field of education and social service training. With £100 she made a down payment for the property at 4 Rosedale Avenue in Kingston to start the Housecraft Training Centre. The Centre opened in January 1946 with a mission to train girls to bring out the best in themselves, to teach them respect for the self and the job. In essence her mission was to equip them with self sufficiency and self reliance. Here she mothered 6000 girls along with her adopted daughter. Amy was co-founder and first Chairman of the Women's Liberal Club which fought to give women an acceptable place in the world both outside and inside the home. She fought relentlessly for the liberation of women and fervently believed that women should qualify themselves in order to achieve their aspirations and not be rewarded with inferior positions because of their sex. She along with Mae Farquharson, while in England raising funds for the Save-the-Children Fund, was advised that the real problem facing Jamaican women relates to the high birth rate. Having realized this, she quickly responded to the problem by teaching birth control on a small scale. Amy along with Dr. Hyacinth Lightbourne and others in 1938 organized the first birth control league. Amy Bailey is a strong Jamaican, inspired by Marcus Garvey, who believed in the dignity of people and the fight against racial discrimination and the marginalization of women.In 1938, she lectured at a Glasgow Peace Conference, Interlaken, Switzerland."

http://www.nlj.gov.jm/bios-a-h#bailey
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby Gils » Tue May 17, 2016 3:56 pm

The honorable & venerated ancestor Tacky, for his heroic acts of courage, skill, determination & bravery both leading up to and during armed conflict against British soldiers at Fort Haldane on April 7th 1760 in St Mary, which eventually led to his beheading & further uprisings across the Island.

The military precision with which these attacks, which took the authorities 6 months to suppress, were carried out and would account for the death of 60 planters is explained in detail here

ihttp://revolt.axismaps.com/project.html"
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Wed May 18, 2016 3:40 am

Gils wrote:The honorable & venerated ancestor Tacky, for his heroic acts of courage, skill, determination & bravery both leading up to and during armed conflict against British soldiers at Fort Haldane on April 7th 1760 in St Mary, which eventually led to his beheading & further uprisings across the Island.

The military precision with which these attacks, which took the authorities 6 months to suppress, were carried out and would account for the death of 60 planters is explained in detail here

ihttp://revolt.axismaps.com/project.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;"

Yes, the great Tacky....
8-)
'In 1760, some fifteen hundred enslaved black men and women— perhaps fewer but probably many more— took advantage of Britain’s Seven Year’s War against France and Spain, to stage a massive uprising in Jamaica, which began on April 7 in the windward parish of St. Mary’s and continued in the leeward parishes until October of the next year. Over the course of eighteen months the rebels killed as many as sixty whites and destroyed many thousands of pounds worth of property. During the suppression of the revolt over five hundred black men and women were killed in battle, executed, or committed suicide. Another 500 were transported from the island for life. Colonists valued the total cost to the island at nearly a quarter of a million pounds. “Whether we consider the extent and secrecy of its plan, the multitude of the conspirators, and the difficulty of opposing its eruptions in such a variety of places at once,” wrote planter-historian Edward Long in his 1774 History of Jamaica, this revolt was “more formidable than any hitherto known in the West Indies.”'

Up to then, that was the greatest slave revolt in the history of the British empire....
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Wed May 18, 2016 3:42 am

Another great Jamaican...Bishop Percival Gibson:

http://www.angelfire.com/ks3/kcobaja/PercivalGibson.htm
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Thu May 19, 2016 5:10 am

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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby mikesiva » Fri May 20, 2016 3:21 am

'"Cedric "Sugar Boy" Titus emerged in the parish of Trelawny which was the centre of sugar-cane operations in Jamaica. It was a time when sugar was supreme and ruled by the plantocracy—a ruling class formed by the White owners of the sugar-cane industry. Sugar Boy brought fundamental change to the industry. Speaking truth to power, he secured a better deal for the Black cane farmers who grew sugar cane on their small plots.Sugar Boy was a giant who played a major role in breaking down mental slavery and building the new Jamaican nation in the early part of the 20th Century. The untimely death of this trailblazer in a bizarre traffic accident blighted the bright promise of even greater achievement for the country he loved. But, thanks to his family, his legacy is secure, captured for posterity in this book."'

http://www.libroslatinos.com/cgi-bin/libros/154148.html
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Re: Great Jamaicans in history

Postby Gils » Sat May 21, 2016 3:14 am

Mary Seacole,1805 – 14 May 1881 - the only international Jamaican discussed in the English state schools curriculum, circa 1980's. ( Although plans were afoot in 2012 to remove her from it )

Best known for her nursing abilities - knowledge of herbal treatments - & care of british soldiers during the Crimean war, she was also praised for her work in Central. America, the Caribbean & Britain. Often acclaimed by her more famous english contemporary Florence Nightingale, she was posthumously awarded the Jamaican Order of Merit in 1991 and voted the greatest black Briton in 2004.

http://www.islandjamsradio.com/news/lon ... imean-war/"
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